Japanese Mask

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Japanese Mask

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Japanese Mask Video

Traditional Masks In Japan Japanology His mouth is almost always rounded and skewed to one side, as the stories about him usually involve him blowing on a bamboo pipe. Masks are usually painted red, but painted other colors such as blue, yellow, green, or black. Tokyo Day Trips. Rural Japanese festivals often involve locals wearing oni masks running wild with mischief through the streets. Check this out Houses. Oberhofen: Zytglogge-Verlag, You Yu. Wir verwenden Cookies. As Noh is an art form that utilizes masks, there is a great variety of. Andere Optionen könnten noch verfügbar sein. Mehr erfahren. Japanische Plastik Masken mit einer elastischen Schnur, die sie am Kopf hält. MwSt, zzgl. Angebot bis 5 Juli. Nur angemeldete, verifizierte Link können Bewertungen schreiben. Diese Website verwendet Cookies. Excellent product, timely shipment and service, keep it up!!! In Japanese traditions, foxes are thought to be the messengers of the tell Elektro Feuerzeug Aufbau exact Inari, who is the protector of rice, agriculture, and fertility. Ähnliche Artikel.

Kitsune masks or fox masks are worn by participants in certain Shinto festivals or by attendees just for fun. Historically, foxes were viewed as magical creatures with the ability to shapeshift.

They were also seen as messengers of Inari, the Shinto god of rice, commerce, and prosperity. As a result, they are important figures in some festivals involving this god.

Hyottoko is a silly, childlike figure with a comical expression on his face. His mouth is almost always rounded and skewed to one side, as the stories about him usually involve him blowing on a bamboo pipe.

In some traditional Japanese dances during festivals, dancers perform the role of the clown while wearing Hyottoko masks.

Okame is like the female version of Hyottoko, and their masks usually appear together. They can be worn by dancers to perform amusing, silly dance steps.

Like her male counterpart, Okame is a positive figure and sometimes thought to bring good luck. She is portrayed as a woman with a large, oval-shaped head and smiling eyes.

She is also known as otafuku. Kyogen is often performed as comic relief during the intermissions of Noh theater, which is typically more serious and solemn.

In Kyogen, actors performing non-human roles wear masks, and in Noh, masks are much more common, with hundreds of different types available.

Most of the masks on this list also appear in Noh theater or are based on it. Men-yoroi were the armored masks worn by warriors and samurai.

These days, most men-yoroi are on display in museums. In the Yakuza series, the character Goro Majima has a large tattoo of a Hannya on his back.

In a Detective Conan anime-only case, a woman who killed the people who drove her sister to suicide used the Hannya as a murder motif.

The Hannya legend also influences a local tradition that follows the story of two envious girls who set up another named Ohana to be executed so they can steal her various kimonos, but end up murdered by Ohana's vengeful soul, reborn as an immortal demon.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources.

Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. W Asian Folklore Studies. Asian Theatre Journal. Aoi no Ue, Noh Performance Guide 7.

To the Bamana people, swords represent the sprouting of grain. There has been a proliferation of such masks recently but there is a long history of protective armour and even medical masks to ward off plague. Geschichte einer Form. Https://personalmedicaltreatments.co/serisses-online-casino/beste-spielothek-in-unter-adlitzgraben-finden.php of the challenges in anthropology is finding the precise derivation of human culture and early here, with the invention and use of the mask only one area of Japanese Mask inquiry. Pueblo craftsmen produced impressive work for masked religious ritual, especially the Hopi and Zuni. However, most African masks are now being produced for the tourist continue reading. Small Towns. All the roles were historically continue reading by male actors. Which masks caught your attention? Jun 30, - If you feel inspired by Japanese masks that are commonly used in theatres, festivals, and other rituals, and are wondering how to get one for. Without the mask, where you will hide? I gathered these masks exactly how I found in an on-line museum, where some people have categorized them. Mask of Tengu small Japanese-made papier-mache (japan import) bei Amazon.​de | Günstiger Preis | Kostenloser Versand ab 29€ für ausgewählte Artikel. Halloween Masks Adults Japanese Fox mask Fox Demon mask Hand-Painted Fox mask Fox mask Diffuse cos mask @Plastic Version _ Fox Hand-Painted Without the mask, where you will hide? I gathered these masks exactly how I found in an on-line museum, where some people have categorized them.

Masks were also used as part of court entertainments, possibly combining political with religious significance.

Masks remain an important feature of popular carnivals and religious dances, such as The Dance of the Moors and Christians. Mexico, in particular, retains a great deal of creativity in the production of masks, encouraged by collectors.

Wrestling matches, where it is common for the participants to wear masks , are very popular, and many of the wrestlers can be considered folk heroes.

For instance, the popular wrestler El Santo continued wearing his mask after retirement, revealed his face briefly only in old age, and was buried wearing his silver mask.

Masked characters, usually divinities, are a central feature of Indian dramatic forms, many based on depicting the epics Mahabharata and Ramayana.

Countries that have had strong Indian cultural influences — Cambodia , Burma , Indonesia , Thailand , and Lao — have developed the Indian forms, combined with local myths, and developed their own characteristic styles.

The masks are usually highly exaggerated and formalised, and share an aesthetic with the carved images of monstrous heads that dominate the facades of Hindu and Buddhist temples.

These faces or Kirtimukhas , 'Visages of Glory', are intended to ward off evil and are associated with the animal world as well as the divine.

During ceremonies, these visages are given active form in the great mask dramas of the South and South-eastern Asian region.

In Indonesia, the mask dance predates Hindu-Buddhist influences. It is believed that the use of masks is related to the cult of the ancestors, which considered dancers the interpreters of the gods.

Native Indonesian tribes such as Dayak have masked Hudoq dance that represents nature spirits. In Java and Bali , masked dance is commonly called topeng and demonstrated Hindu influences as it often feature epics such as Ramayana and Mahabharata.

The native story of Panji also popular in topeng masked dance. Indonesian topeng dance styles are widely distributed, such as topeng Bali, Cirebon, Betawi, Malang, Yogyakarta, and Solo.

In China, masks are thought to have originated in ancient religious ceremonies. Images of people wearing masks have been found in rock paintings along the Yangtze.

Later mask forms brings together myths and symbols from shamanism and Buddhism. Shigong dance masks were used in shamanic rituals to thank the gods, while nuo dance masks protected from bad spirits.

Wedding masks were used to pray for good luck and a lasting marriage, and "Swallowing Animal" masks were associated with protecting the home and symbolised the "swallowing" of disaster.

Opera masks were used in a basic "common" form of opera performed without a stage or backdrops. These led to colourful facial patterns that we see in today's Peking opera.

Korean masks have a long tradition associated with shamanism and later in ritual dance. Korean masks were used in war, on both soldiers and their horses; ceremonially, for burial rites in jade and bronze and for shamanistic ceremonies to drive away evil spirits; to remember the faces of great historical figures in death masks; and in the arts, particularly in ritual dances, courtly, and theatrical plays.

The present uses are as miniature masks for tourist souvenirs, or on mobile phones , where they hang as good-luck talismans. Japanese masks are part of a very old and highly sophisticated and stylized theatrical tradition.

Although the roots are in prehistoric myths and cults, they have developed into refined art forms. The oldest masks are the gigaku. The form no longer exists, and was probably a type of dance presentation.

The bugaku developed from this — a complex dance-drama that used masks with moveable jaws. The masks are worn throughout very long performances and are consequently very light.

Kabuki is the theatre of modern Japan, rooted in the older forms, but in this form masks are replaced by painted faces. Theatre in the Middle East, as elsewhere, was initially of a ritual nature, dramatising man's relationship with nature, the gods, and other human beings.

It grew out of sacred rites of myths and legends performed by priests and lay actors at fixed times and often in fixed locations.

Folk theatre — mime, mask, puppetry, farce, juggling — had a ritual context in that it was performed at religious or rites of passage such as days of naming, circumcisions, and marriages.

Over time, some of these contextual ritual enactments became divorced from their religious meaning and they were performed throughout the year.

Some years ago, kings and commoners alike were entertained by dance and mime accompanied by music where the dancers often wore masks, a vestige of an earlier era when such dances were enacted as religious rites.

According to George Goyan , this practice evoked that of Roman funeral rites where masked actor-dancers represented the deceased with motions and gestures mimicking those of the deceased while singing the praise of his life see Masks in Performance above.

Masks are used throughout Europe, and are frequently integrated into regional folk celebrations and customs.

Old masks are preserved and can be seen in museums and other collections, and much research has been undertaken into the historical origins of masks.

Most probably represent nature spirits , and as a result many of the associated customs are seasonal.

The original significance would have survived only until the introduction of Christianity which then incorporated many of the customs into its own traditions.

In the process their meanings were also changed so, for example, old gods and goddesses were, literally, demonised and were viewed as mere devils , subjugated to the Abrahamic God.

Many of the masks and characters used in European festivals belong to the contrasting categories of the 'good', or 'idealised beauty', set against the 'ugly' or 'beastly' and grotesque.

This is particularly true of the Germanic and Central European festivals. Another common type is the Fool , sometimes considered to be the synthesis of the two contrasting type of Handsome and Ugly.

The oldest representations of masks are animal masks, such as the cave paintings of Lascaux in the Dordogne in southern France. Such masks survive in the alpine regions of Austria and Switzerland, and may be connected with hunting or shamanism , and tend to be particularly associated with the New Year and Carnival festivals.

The debate about the meaning of these and other mask forms continues in Europe, where monsters , bears , wild men , harlequins , hobby horses , and other fanciful characters appear in carnivals throughout the continent.

It is generally accepted that the masks, noise, colour and clamour are meant to drive away the forces of darkness and winter, and open the way for the spirits of light and the coming of spring.

Another tradition of European masks developed, more self-consciously, from court and civic events, or entertainments managed by guilds and co-fraternities.

These grew out of the earlier revels and had become evident by the 15th century in places like Rome, and Venice , where they developed as entertainments to enliven towns and cities.

Thus the Maundy Thursday carnival in St Marks Square in Venice, attended by the Doge and aristocracy also involved the guilds, including a guild of maskmakers.

By the 18th century, it was already a tourist attraction, Goethe saying that he was ugly enough not to need a mask.

The carnival was repressed during the Napoleonic Republic, although in the s its costumes and the masks aping the C 18th heyday were revived.

During the Reformation, many of these carnival customs began to die out in Protestant regions, although they seem to have survived in Catholic areas despite the opposition of the ecclesiastical authorities.

So by the 19th century, the carnivals of the relatively wealthy bourgeois town communities, with elaborate masques and costumes, existed side by side with the ragged and essentially folkloric customs of the rural areas.

In the beginning of the new century, on 19 August , the Bulgarian archeologist Georgi Kitov discovered a g gold mask in the burial mound "Svetitsata" near Shipka , Central Bulgaria.

It is a very fine piece of workmanship made out of massive 23 karat gold. Unlike other masks discovered in the Balkans of which 3 are in Republic of Macedonia and two in Greece , it is now kept in the National Archaeological Museum in Sofia.

It is considered to be the mask of a Thracian king, presumably Teres. Masks play a key part within world theatre traditions, particularly non-western theatre forms.

They also continue to be a vital force within contemporary theatre, and their usage takes a variety of forms.

In many cultural traditions, the masked performer is a central concept and is highly valued.

In the western tradition, actors in Ancient Greek theatre wore masks, as they do in traditional Japanese Noh drama. In some Greek masks, the wide and open mouth of the mask contained a brass megaphone enabling the voice of the wearer to be projected into the large auditoria.

In medieval Europe, masks were used in mystery and miracle plays to portray allegorical creatures, and the performer representing God frequently wore a gold or gilt mask.

During the Renaissance , masques and ballet de cour developed — courtly masked entertainments that continued as part of ballet conventions until the late eighteenth century.

The masked characters of the Commedia dell'arte included the ancestors of the modern clown. In contemporary western theatre, the mask is often used alongside puppetry to create a theatre which is essentially visual rather than verbal, and many of its practitioners have been visual artists.

Masks are an important part of many theatre forms throughout world cultures, and their usage in theatre has often developed from, or continues to be part of old, highly sophisticated, stylized theatrical traditions.

Masks and puppets were often incorporated into the theatre work of European avant-garde artists from the turn of the nineteenth century.

Alfred Jarry , Pablo Picasso , Oskar Schlemmer , and other artists of the Bauhaus School, as well as surrealists and Dadaists , experimented with theatre forms and masks in their work.

In the 20th century, many theatre practitioners, such as Meyerhold , Edward Gordon Craig , Jacques Copeau , and others in their lineage, attempted to move away from Naturalism.

They turned to sources such as Oriental Theatre particularly Japanese Noh theatre and commedia dell'arte , [43] both of which forms feature masks prominently.

Edward Gordon Craig — in A Note on Masks proposed the virtues of using masks over the naturalism of the actor.

Copeau, in his attempts to "Naturalise" the actor [46] decided to use mask to liberate them from their "excessive awkwardness". Lecoq met Amleto Satori , a sculptor, and they collaborated on reviving the techniques of making traditional leather Commedia masks.

Later, developing Copeau's "noble mask", Lecoq would ask Satori to make him masques neutre the neutral mask.

For Lecoq, masks became an important training tool, the neutral mask being designed to facilitate a state of openness in the student-performers, moving gradually on to character and expressive masks, and finally to "the smallest mask in the world" the clown's red-nose.

One highly important feature of Lecoq's use of mask, wasn't so much its visual impact on stage, but how it changed the performers movement on stage.

It was a body-based approach to mask work, rather than a visually led one. This work with masks also relates to performing with portable structures and puppetry.

Students of Lecoq have continued using masks in their work after leaving the school, such as in John Wright 's Trestle Theatre. In America, mask-work was slower to arrive, but the Guerrilla Theatre movement, typified by groups such as the San Francisco Mime Troupe and Bread and Puppet Theatre took advantage of it.

Influenced by modern dance, modern mime, Commedia dell'arte and Brecht such groups took to the streets to perform highly political theatre.

Peter Schumann , the founder of Bread and Puppet theatre, made particular use of German Carnival masks. These companies, and others, have a strong social agenda, and combine masks, music and puppetry to create a visual theatrical form.

These companies had a big influence on the next generation of groups working in visual theatre, including IOU and Horse and Bamboo Theatre , who create a theatre in which masks are used along with puppets, film and other visual forms, with an emphasis on the narrative structure.

Masks are also familiar as pieces of kit associated with practical functions, usually protective. Noh actors change directions of their bodies depending on which facial expression they should show.

Hyottoko is a silly, childlike character in traditional Japanese performances with a funny facial expression on his face.

His mouth is always rounded and skewed to one side. This feature was derived from a mask of Usobuki used in Kyogen traditional Japanese comical drama , and the name Hyottoko was originated from Hiotoko, who blew fire with a bamboo pipe.

Okame masks, sometimes called Otafuku, demonstrate a female character with a round face, small nose, and small head design.

They are often referred to a female version of Hyottoko, and both Okame and Hyottoko usually appear together. Also, Okame is known to bring a good fortune.

Oni is a demon, and their masks are depicted as frightening with long sharp teeth and horns. Masks are usually painted red, but painted other colors such as blue, yellow, green, or black.

Each color indicates the calamity people want to overcome. Red is greed, blue is hatred, yellow is regret, green is disease, and black is grumbling.

Oni masks are commonly used in Setsubun, which is the day people expel a bad fortune and invite a good fortune by throwing beans.

This event is held both at shrines and at each household. Parents wear masks to play Oni to frighten their children.

Hannya masks are used in Noh theater, representing female demons. They are portrayed as a female with much jealousy and hatred with long horns, sharp teeth, and distorted eyes.

Hannya masks at a glance seem to show anger and jealous, but at the same time, if seen from a certain angle, they seem to show sadness.

Kitsune is fox. Kitsune masks are worn by participants or attendees in Shinto festivals. Kitsune masks or fox masks are worn by participants in certain Shinto festivals or by attendees just for fun.

Historically, foxes were viewed as magical creatures with the ability to shapeshift. They were also seen as messengers of Inari, the Shinto god of rice, commerce, and prosperity.

As a result, they are important figures in some festivals involving this god. Hyottoko is a silly, childlike figure with a comical expression on his face.

His mouth is almost always rounded and skewed to one side, as the stories about him usually involve him blowing on a bamboo pipe.

In some traditional Japanese dances during festivals, dancers perform the role of the clown while wearing Hyottoko masks.

Okame is like the female version of Hyottoko, and their masks usually appear together. They can be worn by dancers to perform amusing, silly dance steps.

Like her male counterpart, Okame is a positive figure and sometimes thought to bring good luck. She is portrayed as a woman with a large, oval-shaped head and smiling eyes.

In Japan, there are rich traditions of wearing masks that goes back to the earliest days of its recorded history. Ideal für Festival, Cosplay oder Halloween. Gratis Beautyproben! Finishing of mask's surface is egg-like a mat white paint. The more elaborate mold will be finished more nice-looking products. Mit der Benutzung unserer Webseite akzeptierst du die Datenschutzrechtlinien sowie die Allgemeinen Nutzungsbedingungen go here erklärst dich damit einverstanden. Wir liefern normalerweise innerhalb von 3 Arbeitstagen, aber bei starker Auslastung kann es auch bis zu 5 Tage dauern.

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